Types of Nursing - Which Will You Choose?

Want to be a nurse?
You’ll start out as a generalist and then likely develop a specialty.

In Ontario there are three types of nursing positions, which reflect different levels of education and responsibility.
Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs) Since 2005, all RPNs in Ontario must earn a diploma in Practical Nursing by taking a program consisting of four semesters over two years in a college program leading to a diploma in Practical Nursing. Because an RPN’s education is less comprehensive and more focused, RPNs’ careers are most appropriately suited to patients with less complex needs, and patients with stable and predictable conditions.
Registered Nurses (RNs) Since 2005, all Ontario RNs must have a baccalaureate degree. RNs either take a collaborative college-university nursing program or a four-year university nursing program — both leading to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BScN) or Bachelor of Nursing degree (BN). Because an RN’s education is more comprehensive, they have a deeper knowledge base to draw on in areas such as clinical practice, critical thinking and research utilization. RNs can care for patients with more complex needs in unpredictable situations. 
Nurse Practitioners An NP is a RN with advanced university education who provides personalized, quality health care to patients. Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner Education in Ontario is delivered by a consortium of nine universities under COUPN (Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing). There are four NP specialties in the extended class: primary health care, adult, pediatric care and anaesthesia. 
YOUR CAREER PATH
RNs are prepared as generalists. So when you graduate, you’ll be confident in your skills and knowledge to practice on all people with any illness and in any setting. But as you move along gaining experiencing, shifting from novice to expert, you will build on your entry-level competencies.
Areas of practice
RNs may work in dozens of different areas of practice from public health or palliative care. Don’t know where to begin? Here are four “practice profiles” (researched and written by the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario). Get a glimpse of a day in the life of a nurse who works in each of these areas, find out what education you need to work in the field, and learn about the scope of practice.
Home Health Nursing
Occupational Health Nursing
Palliative care
Parish/Faith Community Nursing
“I had no idea there were so many different areas of practice!” ARTICLE TO COME.
Nursing Specialization
Some of you may focus your practice in a particular field of nursing. The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) offers voluntary certification in 20 nursing areas — an excellent way to maintain high standards of care in your practice. More than 17,000 nurses coast-to-coast have achieved certification in various specialties. (Candidates must first take the Initial Certification Exam; renewal is necessary every five years.) 
The credentials can be added to your title RN; certification shows nurses have taken initiative to keep their skills up to date and maintain professional competencies, which are recognized by provincial governing colleges and employers alike.
Specialization may relate to patient age (pediatrics, gerontology), health problem (pain management), diagnostic group (orthopedics), the practice setting (emergency, school, research institution), type of care (palliative, critical, occupational) and a combination of these. 
Here is a complete list of specialties (for which) certification is available.
Cardiovascular Nursing
Community Health Nursing
Critical Care Nursing
Critical Care Pediatric Nursing
Emergency Nursing
Enterostomal Therapy Nursing
Gastroenterology Nursing
Gerontological Nursing
Hospice Palliative Care Nursing
Medical-Surgical Nursing
Nephrology Nursing
Neuroscience Nursing
Occupational Health Nursing
Oncology Nursing
Orthopaedic Nursing
PeriAnesthesia Nursing
Perinatal Nursing
Perioperative Nursing
Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Rehabilitation Nursing
Find out how to become a nurse here.
[Link to Become a Nurse landing pagIn Ontario there are three types of nursing positions, which reflect different levels of education and responsibility.

Registered Practical Nurses (RPNs)

 Since 2005, all RPNs in Ontario must earn a diploma in Practical Nursing by taking a program consisting of four semesters over two years in a college program leading to a diploma in Practical Nursing. Because an RPN’s education is less comprehensive and more focused, RPNs’ careers are most appropriately suited to patients with less complex needs, and patients with stable and predictable conditions.

Registered Nurses (RNs)

Since 2005, all Ontario RNs must have a baccalaureate degree. RNs either take a collaborative college-university nursing program or a four-year university nursing program — both leading to a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree (BScN) or Bachelor of Nursing degree (BN). Because an RN’s education is more comprehensive, they have a deeper knowledge base to draw on in areas such as clinical practice, critical thinking and research utilization. RNs can care for patients with more complex needs in unpredictable situations. 

Nurse Practitioners

An NP is a RN with advanced university education who provides personalized, quality health care to patients. Primary Health Care Nurse Practitioner Education in Ontario is delivered by a consortium of nine universities under COUPN (Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing). There are four NP specialties in the extended class: primary health care, adult, pediatric care and anaesthesia. 

YOUR CAREER PATH

RNs are prepared as generalists. So when you graduate, you’ll be confident in your skills and knowledge to practice on all people with any illness and in any setting. But as you move along gaining experiencing, shifting from novice to expert, you will build on your entry-level competencies.

Areas of practiceRNs may work in dozens of different areas of practice from public health or palliative care. Don’t know where to begin? Here are four “practice profiles” (researched and written by the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario). Get a glimpse of a day in the life of a nurse who works in each of these areas, find out what education you need to work in the field, and learn about the scope of practice.Home Health NursingOccupational Health NursingPalliative careParish/Faith Community Nursing

Nursing Specialization

Some of you may focus your practice in a particular field of nursing. The Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) offers voluntary certification in 20 nursing areas — an excellent way to maintain high standards of care in your practice. More than 17,000 nurses coast-to-coast have achieved certification in various specialties. (Candidates must first take the Initial Certification Exam; renewal is necessary every five years.) 
The credentials can be added to your title RN; certification shows nurses have taken initiative to keep their skills up to date and maintain professional competencies, which are recognized by provincial governing colleges and employers alike.
Specialization may relate to patient age (pediatrics, gerontology), health problem (pain management), diagnostic group (orthopedics), the practice setting (emergency, school, research institution), type of care (palliative, critical, occupational) and a combination of these. 

Here is a complete list of specialties (for which) certification is available.

Cardiovascular Nursing

Community Health Nursing

Critical Care Nursing

Critical Care Pediatric Nursing

Emergency Nursing

Enterostomal Therapy Nursing

Gastroenterology Nursing

Gerontological Nursing

Hospice Palliative Care Nursing

Medical-Surgical Nursing

Nephrology Nursing

Neuroscience Nursing

Occupational Health Nursing

Oncology Nursing

Orthopaedic Nursing

PeriAnesthesia Nursing

Perinatal Nursing

Perioperative Nursing

Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

Rehabilitation Nursing

Find out how to become a nurse here.